The Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security has released its report. The document is in excess of 350 pages long and makes 39 recommendations for the consideration of the Government. The Internet Society of Australia is appreciative of the Committee's due consideration of our submissions and presentation, which are acknowledged in the report. 

The report can be found at the following link:

http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Joint/Intelligence_and_Security/Data_Retention/Report


 

"The Internet Society of Australia acknowledges the work that the committee has undertaken on this very complex matter. We note that in a number of important areas the committee appears to have taken into account the confidential information that was supplied by the Internet Society, at the committee's request, regarding flaws in the Bill".

 Full Media Release here


 

The Internet Society of Australia has called for further consideration of the implications of the proposed Data Retention legislation that it has labelled as “deeply flawed”.

The Society was responding to newspaper reports of the outcome of an inquiry into the Data Retention Bill by the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS).

CEO, Laure Patton, said that while his board and members understood concerns about terrorism many in the community would be disturbed if the Parliament’s response damaged the Internet’s enduring open and accessible nature – the key feature that has made it such an important communications tool in the 21st Century.

  Full Media Release here


 

The Internet Society of Australia has today called for a balanced, evidence-based approach as the Government moves to address the threat of terrorism.

CEO, Laure Patton, said his board and members understood community concerns about terrorism. However there is also widespread concern at responses that could damage the Internet’s enduring open and accessible nature – the key feature that has made it such an important communications tool in the 21st Century.

 Full Media Release here.


 

The Internet Society of Australia has urged its members and all interested parties to take advantage of the opportunity to comment on the draft Online Copyright Infringement Code released today.

Following a period for public comment a finalised Code will be submitted in April for registration by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

 

The Internet Society is a member of the stakeholder advisory group that had input into the draft Code. However, CEO Laurie Patton has indicated that the Society is keen for its members to provide their views on the draft during the public comment period.

"It's not often that the public is given the ability to make its voice heard on important initiatives such as this. There are many aspects of the draft Code that will impact on Internet users and it is important that every angle is presented and considered before ACMA accepts the Code for registration", Mr Patton commented.